Submission Number: MBTL-SEPA-DEIS-0000660 

Received: 5/21/2016 7:10:43 PM
Commenter: Jean Avery
Organization: 
State: Washington

Agency: Cowlitz County and the Washington Department of Ecology
Initiative: Millennium Bulk-Terminals Longview SEPA DEIS
Attachments: No Attachments
Submission Text
Please deny the permit for the Millennium coal terminal. I am concerned about the negative impact to fish and the aquatic habitat. According to the draft EIS: • S-26: Impacts on fish could increase during operations from the new overwater structures and increase in vessel transits. • S-26: Operations activities could result in temporary water quality impacts from a release of hazardous materials (fuels and lubricants) that could affect aquatic habitat or fish near the discharge point. • S-26: Impacts from increases in vessel traffic could increase the risk of fish stranding from vessel wakes. • S-26: Coal dust and fugitive coal particles could be generated during operations of the Proposed Action and rail transport that could potentially affect fish through physical or toxicological means. Coal particles could affect fish in a manner comparable to any form of suspended particulates, such as tissue abrasion, smothering, obstruction or damage to feeding or respiratory organs, and other effects resulting from reduced quantity or quality of light. Another potential manner in which coal could affect aquatic fish is through coal leachates. Unburnt coal can be a source of acidity, salinity, trace metals, hydrocarbons, and potentially macronutrients if they leach from the coal matrix into aquatic habitats. • S-27: Construction activities would permanently remove terrestrial and aquatic habitats….Grading and clearing activities would permanently remove 201.95 acres of terrestrial habitat….Construction activities would also result in the permanent loss of approximately 10.78 acres of aquatic habitat (ditches and ponds) throughout the project area. • S-27: Routine operations of the Proposed Action could result in spills or leaks of hazardous materials from vehicles, trains, or equipment. Contaminants could affect terrestrial habitat and water quality, thus, degrading aquatic habitat in the Columbia River and drainage ditches in the aquatic study area. • S-28: Another potential manner in which coal could affect aquatic wildlife is through coal leachates. Unburnt coal can be a source of acidity, salinity, trace metals, hydrocarbons, and potentially macronutrients if they leach from the coal matrix into aquatic habitats. Please deny the permits for the coal terminal, given the adverse ecological and economic impacts on fish and the aquatic habitat.